Press Reports

Posted: December 20, 2008 in Other Ripper Research
It seems that as of November 19, 1888, Scotland Yard was aware that Jack The Ripper was travelling down to London from either Birmingham, Manchester or some other town in the Midlands. I found all of the press reports that mention the areas of the West Midlands (where Dr. Alfred William Pearson resided). The following press reports mention areas like:
 
*Brierley Hill – Pearson was born here
*West Bromwich – a town in Staffordshire which is quite close to Kingswinford
*Staffordshire – where Brierley Hill and Kingswinford are located
*Birmingham – Pearson received his medical training at the Birmingham General Hospital
*Manchester – the name of the city where the Manchester United Order of Oddfellows was formed (Pearson was a Surgeon to the Oddfellows)
*Burslem – a town in Stoke-On-Trent, Staffordshire
*Hanley – another town in Stoke-On-Trent, Staffordshire
*Midlands/West Midlands/The Midlands – the area known as the Midlands, which encompasses the areas of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, and Warwickshire, including Birmingham and Wolverhampton
 
1.) Birmingham Evening Mail, U.K.
8 October 1888
 
SEQUEL TO A PRACTICAL JOKE
 
At Brierley Hill Police Court today, Alfred Pearson, moulder, was charged with threatening Thomas Plant. Complainant was walking with a young lady on Saturday night, and in a dark place, Defendant suddenly appeared brandishing a large weapon, and crying "Jack the Ripper." He threatened both. The lady had hysterics from fright. The defendant was bound over for six months. The weapon was a trowel.
 
2.) Irish Times
Dublin, Ireland
Monday, 19 November 1888
 
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS
ARREST OF A MEDICAL MAN
(BY TELEGRAPH)
LONDON, SUNDAY
 
The London police received yesterday afternoon a communication from the Birmingham detectives to the effect that a man suspected of being concerned in the Whitechapel murders had left Birmingham by train to London. Acting on this information, Detectives Leach and White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, proceeded to Willesden Junction and Euston respectively, and at the latter station Inspector White, on the arrival of the Birmingham train, arrested the suspected individual and conveyed him to Scotland Yard. It is stated that the man under arrest has been staying at a common lodging-house in Birmingham since Monday last. The prisoner is a medical man who was some years ago practicing in London with another gentleman of some repute. He is of gentlemanly appearance and manners, and is declared to resemble the man described by witnesses at the inquest as having been seen in company with Maria Jeannette Kelly early on the morning that she was murdered. On being questioned he gave a satisfactory account of himself, and was liberated. No more arrests had been made in Whitechapel up to an early hour this (Sunday) morning.
It is believed that the police authorities have received information to the effect that the Whitechapel murderer is supposed to travel up from Manchester, Birmingham, or some other town in the Midlands for the purpose of committing the crimes. Detectives have been engaged at Willesdon and Euston watching the arrival of trains from the Midlands and the North, and looking for any suspicious passenger, but their efforts up to the present have not met with success.
 
3.) Pall Mall Gazette
19 November 1888
 
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS
 
The police authorities have received information to the effect that the Whitechapel murderer is supposed to travel up from Manchester, Birmingham, or some other town in the Midlands. Detectives have, accordingly, been engaged at Willesden and Euston, watching the arrival of the trains from the North and looking for any suspicious passenger; but their efforts up to present have not met with success.
The funeral of the woman Kelly has once more been postponed. The deceased was a Roman Catholic, and Barnett, with whom she lived, and her landlord, Mr M’Carthy, desired to see her remains interred with the ritual of her Church. The funeral will therefore take place tomorrow in the Roman Catholic cemetery at Leytonstone. The hearse will leave the Shoreditch mortuary at half-past twelve.
 
4.) Times (London)
Monday, 19 November 1888 
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
 
On Saturday afternoon the police arrested at Euston Station a man who had just arrived from Birmingham, and who described himself as a doctor. Upon being questioned the suspect made certain statements as to his whereabouts at the times of the murders which the police are now investigating. The man was subsequently released.
The funeral of the murdered woman Kelly will take place to-day, when her remains will be buried in the Roman Catholic Cemetery at Leytonstone. The hearse will leave the Shoreditch Mortuary at half-past 12.
 
5.) The Ottawa Free Press (Canada)
19 November 1888
 
HAVE THEY GOT HIM NOW?
A Doctor Arrested by Scotland Yard Detectives
IS HE THE WHITECHAPEL FIEND?
He Resembles the Gentleman Seen With the Latest Victim
 
London, Nov.19–[Special]–Over London the Whitechapel murders will hang like a pall. Arrests of suspects have been numerous, but one after another they have been discharged. Great importance, however is attached to an arrest made on Saturday. The Birmingham police have lately watched a man whom they suspected because of his habit of travelling to London on Saturdays. On the arrival of the train at Euston station he stepped out of the carriage briskly and was at once arrested and taken to Scotland Yard for examination. What gives particular force to the suspicion is that the prisoner is a doctor formerly holding a good position and large practice, but recently living in lodging houses. He greatly resembles the "gentleman" seen in company with the latest victim on the morning of the murder. Should he prove to be the criminal, the police will at once be rehabilitated.
 
6.) Daily News
United Kingdom
19 November 1888
 
THE SPITALFIELDS MURDER.
 
Considerable excitement was caused in London on Saturday afternoon by the circulation of a report that a medical man had been arrested at Euston, upon arrival from Birmingham, on a charge of suspected complicity in the Whitechapel murders. It was stated that the accused had been staying at a common lodging-house in Birmingham since Monday last, and the theory was that if, as was supposed by the police, he was connected with the East-end crimes, he left the metropolis by an early train on the morning of the tragedies. The suspected man was of gentlemanly appearance and manners, and somewhat resembled the description of the person declared by witnesses at the inquest to have been seen in company with Kelly early on the morning that she was murdered. Upon being minutely questioned as to his whereabouts at the time of the murders, the suspect was able to furnish a satisfactory account of himself, and was accordingly liberated. It has since transpired that he has been watched by Birmingham police for the last five days, and when he left that town on Saturday the Metropolitan police were advised to continue to "watch" him, not to arrest him.-The police in the East-end had given into their custody late last night a man who gave his name as Charles Akehurst, and his address as Canterbury-road, Ball’s-pond-road, N. Whilst in a house in Flower-and-Dean-street, Spitalfields, with a woman, he made use of certain remarks and acted in a manner which was considered sufficient to justify the woman in handing him over to the police. He was taken to the Commercial-street Police-station, were he was questioned. He was still under detention at one o’clock this morning.
 
 
 
7.) St. James Gazette
London, England
19 November 1888
THE EAST END MURDERS
 
On Saturday afternoon the Birmingham detectives informed the police at Scotland Yard that a man suspected of being concerned in the Whitechapel murders had left that town for train for London. Detectives Leach and White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, proceeded to Willesden Junction and Euston respectively, and at the latter station Inspector White detained the person in question and conveyed him to Scotland Yard. It was stated that he had been staying at a common lodging house in Birmingham since Monday last. The suspected person was a medical man who was some years ago practising in London. He was of gentlemanly appearance and manners, and somewhat resembled the description given by witnesses at the late inquest. After being closely questioned as to his whereabouts at the time of the murders, and supplying a satisfactory account of himself, he was liberated.
 
8.) Morning Advertiser (London)
20 November 1888
A correspondent telegraphs that much excitement has been caused in West Bromwich by the visit of a man resembling much in appearance the published description of the Whitechapel murderer. About dusk on Sunday evening he went to a house in Tentany-lane, and asked the woman who answered his knock whether there were any houses of ill-fame in the neighbourhood, saying he had come down from London specially to destroy the frequenters of such dwellings. He added that he was determined that they should no longer cumber the earth. On being told that there were no such houses anywhere near, the man walked quickly away. The woman had not sufficient presence of mind to raise an alarm, and the man got away without molestation. The police have been communicated with, but no arrest has been made. The man is described as of medium height, about 35 years of age, with dark moustache, and of gentlemanly address.
 
9.) The Munster News and Limerick and Clare Advocate
Limerick, Ireland
Wednesday, 21st November 1888
 
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS
 
A communication was recently received from Birmingham detectives to the effect that a man suspected of being concerned in the Whitechapel murders has left Birmingham for London. Detectives Leach and White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, proceeded to Wellesden Junction and Euston respectively. On the arrival of the train at the latter station, Inspector White detained the suspected individual and conveyed him to Scotland Yard. He was a medical man, some years ago practising in London, with another gentleman of some repute. He had been staying at a common lodging house in Birmingham since Monday last, and somewhat corresponded with the description given at the inquest of the man last seen in company with the woman Kelly. On being questioned he gave a satisfactory account of himself, and was liberated. The Press Association believes that the police authorities have received some information to the effect that the Whitechapel murderer is supposed to travel up from Manchester, Birmingham, or some other town in the Midlands, for the purpose of committing the crimes. Detectives have been engaged at Willesden and Euston watching the arrival of trains from the midlands and the north looking for any suspicious passengers, but their efforts up to the present have not been met with success.
10.) Morning Advertiser (London)
29 November 1888
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
 
Chief-Superintendent Hill, of the Staffordshire Constabulary, has received a letter signed "Jack the Ripper," in which the writer states that he has arrived at Burslem, and that he is going to kill eight more women there and in Hanley. He adds that his knife is eight inches long, and that he will cut the arms off the next woman he murders, and with the letter is a sketch of a dagger.
 
 
 
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