The Real “Old Cock” Of Bishopsgate Station Fame

Posted: January 9, 2010 in Other Ripper Research
In case you are just tuning in to this fabulous saga of the questionable PC George Henry Hutt, the one-night-only gaoler of Bishopsgate Police Station, here is a link to the full story on this "officer" (of Her Majesty’s British Army), click here:
 
 
Now that we are all up to date on the true identity of "Old Cock", we will continue with a few articles on Sir Major-General George Hutt:
 
PRIZE MONEY.
 
Our attention has been called to two advertisements which have appeared in the Sydney Herald relative to the distribution of prize money. As there are a number of retired officers and discharged soldiers in this Province belonging to the regiments mentioned, we insert the information for their benefit. "Banda and Kirwee Prize Money, Saugor Field Force. – Notice is hereby given, that (in addition to the Roll of officers and men of her Majesty’s British Army on the Staff of the Commander-in-Chief in India, and one of the Officers and Men of the 12th Lancers, the receipt of which has already been announced) the Roll of Officers and Men of the 43rd Regiment Light Infantry, entitled to share in the first distribution of the Banda and Kirwee prize money, has been received at this hospital from the Indian Government, and that payment of the shares will be commenced on the termination of one month from the present date. The first distribution will be made in the proportion of 50 to each individual (or private’s) share. Persons entitled to share are requested to make application by letter in the first instance, and the necessary forms to be used in showing their title, identity, &c., will then be supplied. Soldiers still serving should apply through their Commanding Officers; and Pensioners through the Staff Officers of their respective districts. All applicants should be careful to state, in addition to the name of the Officer or Soldier on account of whose services the claim may be made, the rank, regimental number, &c., borne by him at the date of the Capture of Banda or Kirwee (1858). Applications to be addressed to the Secretary Royal Hospital, Chelsea, S.W., George Hutt, Secretary for the Commissioners." The wording of the notice to the officers and men entitled to a share in the Jhansi Prize Money is nearly the same as above, we therefore, only extract that part of the advertisement which will give the name of those regiments, and the sum each individual is entitled to.
1. "Officers on the Staff of the Commander-in-Chief.
2. Officers of the Divisional Staff.
3. Officers and Men of the 1st Brigade Staff.
4. Officers and Men of 2nd Brigade Staff.
5. Officers and Men of No. 6 Field Battery (No. 5 Company, 14th Battalion), Royal Artillery.
6. Officers and Men of the 14th Light Dragoons.
7. Officers and Men of the 14th Light Dragoons.
8. Officers and Men of 86th Foot.
9. Officers and Men of 95th Foot.
10. Officers and Men of 21st Company Royal Engineers.
The first distribution will be made at the rate of 1 to each individual (or private’s) share." Application to be addressed to "The Secretary, Royal Hospital, Chelsea, S.W."
 
Source: Taranaki Herald, Volume XVI, Issue 818, 28 March 1868, Page 3
 
PENSIONS TO DISCHARGED SOLDIERS.
 
To the Editor: Sir, – A few days since a letter of mine was published in the CROSS, recommending discharged soldiers of over fifteen years’ service to apply for "modified" pensions, as such had recently been granted to various applicants. Since that letter was written the claims of men under eighteen years’ service have been rejected, and I forward you an extract of a letter from the Chelsea Commissioners, the publication of which in the CROSS will explain to a number of those concerned whether they have any chance of success or not. – I am, &c.,
                                                                                                              T.M. HAULTAIN.
 
"The Royal Hospital, Chelsea, S.W., 13th June, 1872. – I am directed by the Lords and others, Commissioners of this Hospital, to acknowledge the receipt of your application of 1st April, and in reply to inform you that in accepting a free discharge, granted at your own request, to suit your own convenience, with the right of registry for the deferred pension on attaining a certain age, you thereby relinquish all further claim whatsoever. No warrant issued subsequent to a man’s discharge has any bearing on the rate of pension awarded by the Commissioners of this Hospital at the time of his discharge; but as an act of grace, the Commissioners, in concurrence with the Secretary of State for War, have, in certain instances when a man’s period of service exceeded 18 years, awarded him a pension on the principle recognised in the warrant of May, 1869; but as your period of service amounts only to 17 years 121 days, there are no grounds on which this Board can entertain your application. – (Signed) George Hutt, Secretary and Registrar, Auckland, New Zealand."
 
Source: Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVIII, Issue 4723, 14 October 1872, Page 3
 
Just a few reminders here:
 
* the Ripper victims were hunted with strategic precision, killed quickly and quietly, which denotes that they were killed by soldiers
* a duo of Ripper researchers misled us by stating that George Henry Hutt had worked in life insurance, as a warehouseman and served in the army prior to becoming a Police Constable in 1879, despite the fact that he was born in Birmingham in 1862 and was not listed as a Police Constable or a private in the 1881 Census. They also stated that George Henry Hutt’s father was also named George, when I have discovered that his name was, in fact, William Hutt.
* during the murder of Liz Stride and with all of the subsequent proceedings which followed in Berner Street, it seems that far more was going on at Bishopsgate Police Station between the hours of 11 pm – 1 am. (If I only had a time machine)
* Eddowes gave the name of "Mary Ann Kelly" at the Police Station, when the assassins were looking for a "Kelly" woman who was a prostitute
* Eddowes was released while still under the influence of alcohol at 1 am in the morning, when she should have been kept until daylight
* Eddowes was then killed only 42 minutes after leaving the police station
* the gaoler made a bad decision to release Eddowes at 1 am and does not resemble the "character" of a caring police officer (meant to serve and "protect" the community)
* Eddowes called the gaoler an "old cock" before leaving the station – an old cock is an old rooster or aged rooster, meaning that he was OLD!!! The word OLD in "OLD cock" is very important here. Sir George Hutt was 80 years old in 1888. That certainly qualifies as an OLD cock.
 
OBITUARY
 
OUR OBITUARY includes the death in his eighty-first year, of Major-General Sir George Hutt, from 1863 to 1866, Registrar and Secretary to the Commissioners of Chelsea Hospital, who, in command of a battery of artillery, materially contributed to the victories of Meanee and Hyderabad, and afterwards, during the Indian Mutiny, by his prompt and decisive action, checkmated the mutinous regiments at Kurrachee.
 
Source: The Graphic, Saturday, November 9, 1889; Issue 1041
 
 
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