PC George Henry Hutt and The Metropolitan Meat Market

Posted: January 17, 2010 in Other Ripper Research
Monty just recently left a comment on my blog in regards to PC George Henry Hutt securing employment at the Smithfield Meat Market in the City of London proper, but just this past week, I found out that PC George Henry Hutt had found employment at the Metropolitan Meat Market. I have found a sketch of the Metropolitan Meat Market, and here it is:
 
 
The Metropolitan Markets where PC George Henry Hutt worked after the Ripper case.
 
The Smithfield Meat Market and the Metropolitan Meat Markets were two different meat markets in two different locations as explained in the following newspaper extracts:
 
Metropolitan Meat Market
 
FARM PRODUCE is now selling a little better than was the case a month ago. Wheat is in better request, and fetches about 1s. more money; and fine barley for sowing has been actively inquired after at a good price. Oats remain extremely cheap, but beans and peas have followed the two leading staples, and have picked up slightly in value. Fowls – an important branch of modern farming – are now yielding well, and the big towns present an almost unlimited demand for new-laid eggs at a moderate price. The business in milk and butter has been a little better than formerly. At the Metropolitan Meat Market of Monday a large supply of beef and mutton failed to weaken business; on the contrary, trade was described in the market circulars as "improved all round."
 
Source: The Graphic, Saturday April 28, 1888; Issue 961
 
Smithfield Meat Market
 
Mr. Charles Absolon, the veteran cricketer, hale and hearty, the pride of Smithfield Meat Market, kept his seventy-seventh birthday on May 30. Truly wonderful has been his cricketing career. "Old Charley," as he is familiarly called, played fifty-four matches last season, and scored over 500 runs.
 
Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday June 09, 1894; Page 358; Issue 1724
 
 
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