Ripper Articles From Manitoban Newspapers

Posted: February 21, 2010 in Other Ripper Research
This particular article has been translated from the French language:
 
London, 8

The body of a woman was found dead and mutilated in a house,  in Dorset Street. The murder has been committed in the same room and the victim’s body was cut in a horrible manner. This is undoubtedly a repetition of the killings in Whitechapel. The bloodhounds were brought to the scene and were launched on the scent of the murderer.

London, 9

The name of the unfortunate woman found murdered and mutilated in bed this morning, in Dorset Street, is Mary Jane Lawrence. She was married or lived with a man named Lawrence, who had abandoned her. The name of the murderer remains unknown as in the previous cases.

 
Source: Courrier Du Nord-Ouest, November 15, 1888, Page 1
 


 
JACK THE RIPPER AGAIN.
 
The Whitechapel Fiend Scores a Tenth Murder.
Useless Police Precautions.
The Latest Victim, as Usual, One of the Dregs of Humanity.
 
London, July 17 – The community has been startled by another murder, thought to have been committed by Jack the Ripper. The body of a woman mutilated in the usual frightful manner, was found yesterday in Castle Alley, in the Whitechapel district. There is no trace of the murderer.
London, July 17 – The woman found murdered in Whitechapel early yesterday morning was about forty-five years of age and was known as Keley. She was a servant to Mrs. Smith, the keeper of the baths in Castle Alley. The body was found near a lamp post under the glare of the light. Carts of many descriptions were stacked on both sides of the alley. Just where the murder occurred there was room for a man to stand out of sight. The theory of the police is that the man and woman entered Castle Alley from Petticoat Lane and as they were passing an unoccupied building he thrust a knife into her neck below the right ear and the woman apparently fell on her face as there was mud in front of her dress. The murderer then turned her over and inflicted frightful gashes across her stomach. The police are, as usual, reticent when they know nothing.
 
THE WOMAN’S THROAT WAS CUT.
 
to the spine but no part of her body was missing. Warm blood was flowing from the wound when the body was discovered. A policeman, who with the watchman of an adjacent warehouse must have been within a few yards of the spot where the murder took place when it was committed, heard no noise. Policemen have been placed at fixed points in Whitechapel since the murders preceding that of last night officers have been stationed at a point within a hundred yards of the scene of the late tragedy. An old clay pipe smeared with blood was found alongside the body. It is supposed by the police that this will furnish a clue to the murderer although it may have belonged to the victim. Several arrests of suspects have been made but they were discharged, there being no proof against them.
 
Source: Brandon Sun Weekly, July 25, 1889, Page 7
 


 
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
Newspaper Reporters Engaged in Detective Work.
 
London, Sept. 16. – In spite of all probabilities the belief obtains among the lower classes, as well as in the minds of many others, that the mutilated body found in an archway must be added to the list of "Jack the Ripper’s" victims. Certain London and provincial journals and one prominent Amercican paper have kept men detailed in the Whitechapel district for months past in hopes of discovering the fiendish murderer, who has added a distinctive name and method to the history of crime; but, not withstanding their watching night after night, their efforts have as yet been of no avail. Each one of them has a different theory, and if the wretch is finally caught or definitely ceases his murderous work, the story of their labors, their suspicions and their baffled hopes would be really interesting reading if they could be induced to put aside wounded vanity and retail their true experience. The police detest these amateur detectives, refuse them any information and throw every obstacle in their way.
 
Source: Brandon Sun Weekly, September 19, 1889, Page 2
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
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